This map shows the total number of points that have been completed for the Triangle Bird Count during the spring of 2021. A total of 75 bird species were observed along with a total of 4,013 individuals.

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232 survey points were conducted by our volunteers and lab members. The figure shows the diversity of birds by cities!

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Below is a comparison between TBC 2019 and TBC 2021. Compared to the 2019 result, Song Sparrows and Tufted Titmice were no longer in the top 10 most abundant species in 2021. House Finches, Common Grackles, and European Starlings were the first time entering the top 10 most abundant species in 2021 TBC.

TBC Year 20192021
Sites surveyed 140 sites232 sites
Abundance 2803 individuals4013 individuals
Species Richness 70 species75 species
Top 10 Species Observed1. Northern Cardinal (330)
2. American Robin (230)
3. Carolina Wren (141)
4. Carolina Chickadee (139)
5. American Crow (135)
6. Eastern Towhee (134)
7. Chipping Sparrow (112)
8. Northern Mockingbird (111)
9. Song Sparrow (106)
10. Tufted Titmouse (94)
1. Northern Cardinal (371)
2. American Robin (369)
3. House Finch (196)
4. Carolina Wren (176)
5. Common Grackle (173)
6. European Starling (170)
7. American Crow (152)
8. Chipping Sparrow (149)
9. Northern Mockingbird (147)
10. Carolina Chickadee (140)
10. Eastern Towhee (140)
Biodiversity of the Triangle Cities1. Raleigh (58 species from 56 sites)
2. Cary (51 species from 32 sites)
3. Durham (45 species from 29 sites)
4. Garner (36 species from 16 sites)
5. Chapel Hill (11 species from 6 sites)
6. Carrboro (5 species from 1 site)
1. Raleigh (66 species from 96 sites)
2. Durham (54 species from 56 sites)
3. Garner (50 species from 12 sites)
4. Cary (49 species from 28 sites)
5. Chapel Hill (48 species from 25 sites)
6. Carrboro (34 species from 12 sites)

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Using the number of observations per site, here are some trends of changes in observations from 2019 to 2021.

1.Trend of non-native species from 2019 to 2021
The observations of European Starlings and House Sparrows both increased 27% from 2019 to 2021 while Rock Pigeons remain stable.

2.Trend of wood-warblers (Parulidae) from 2019 to 2021
The number of warbler species observed increased from 7 to 11. Despite most of our survey sites are located in residential or developed lands, we were still able to find some surprising warblers including a Canada Warbler in a South Durham neighborhood and 2 Blackpoll Warblers in a hospital parking lot in Cary.

3.Trend of flycatchers (Tyrannidae) from 2019 to 2021
A new flycatcher species Eastern Kingbird was added to 2021 TBC. While other flycatcher species remain stable, the observations of Great Crested Flycatcher increased more than 3 times this year.

4.Trend of thrushes (Turdidae) from 2019 to 2021
Two new thrush species Wood Thrush and Veery were added to 2021 TBC. The observations of American Robins remain stable while Eastern Bluebirds increased 10%.

5.Trend of woodpeckers (Picidae) from 2019 to 2021
Two new woodpecker species Pileated Woodpecker and Red-headed Woodpecker were added to 2021 TBC. The observations of Red-bellied Woodpeckers decreased 36% while Downy Woodpeckers increase about 2 times this year.

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We are also using the Triangle Bird Count dataset to answer research questions related to Bird Abundance, Urban Ecology, and Urban Biodiversity. We will keep updating the latest findings and publications to our TBC volunteers. Thank you for your contribution to Triangle Bird Count!